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Enhancing the Environment by Preserving Soil, Water & Our Resources

FAQ's

What are the reasons I would need to submit a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP)?

There are two things that trigger the need for a SWPPP. Every time you disturb an acre or more of land, you will need to submit a SWPPP. The other thing that might require a SWPPP (even on disturbances of less than an acre) is the proximity of the project to a waterway. This includes streams, lakes, ponds and wetlands. If you are unsure about the need for a SWPPP, please contact MS4 Coordinator Rick Brown at 219-608-8243. You can find a helpful link to a template by visiting the LaPorte County MS4 Site. (click here)


When do I submit the SWPPP?

You must submit your SWPPP to the MS4 Coordinator BEFORE you receive your building permit. The Building Commissioner WILL NOT issue you a building permit until you have your application approved from the MS4 Coordinator. The application is available in the Building Commissioners Office and at the MS4 and LaPorte County Soil and Water Conservation District Office: 2857 West State Rd. 2. LaPorte.


I am doing a project for a municipality such as a sewer line extension or utility project. Must I still file a SWPPP?

Absolutely! EVERYONE needs to have a SWPPP on file if they are disturbing an acre or more of land or if their project is in close proximity to a water body. All municipal projects must submit their plans to the LaPorte County Soil and Water Conservation District. Contact Sheila Batchelor for more information at 219-326-6808, ext. 2116


I saw some mud running off of a construction site into a storm drain. Who do I call to report this?

Any erosion or sediment concerns can (and should!) be reported to MS4 Coordinator Rick Brown.  He can be reached at 219-608-8243. This includes mud from construction sites, improper use of silt fencing, people pouring things down storm drains, etc. If you see any illicit discharges (pipes being run into waterways) this should be reported as well. Only by working together can we all achieve the goal of fishable, swimmable waters.


What is a rain garden?

A rain-garden is a depressional (bowl-shaped) garden planted with deep-rooted native plants. These plants help infiltrate storm-water back into the ground-where it belongs. For more information, contact Nicole Messacar.  Phone number: 219-326-6808, ext. 2115


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